Major, Minor, & Certificate Requirements

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JUPS Major 

JUPS Minor/Certificate

JUPS Major 

Students are required to complete a total of 11 courses in the major, including the completion of a Service Learning Requirement through either a Community-Based Learning course or the 4th-Credit Option for Social Action (UNXD-130). In addition, students are encouraged to meet with a JUPS advisor to consider General Education courses that may contribute to the major. At least one course must be taken on theories or theologies of justice and peace; this requirement could be satisfied by a General Education course or a cross-listed JUPS elective, which would count toward the total of 11 major courses (with approval of a JUPS advisor). JUPS majors will conclude their program with a thesis project as part of the Senior Seminar course. The requirements for the JUPS major are as follows:

Foundational Courses (5 courses total)

Introduction to Justice and Peace (JUPS 123)

This gateway required course presents a wide range of theoretical and practical perspectives on peace and social justice, including: poverty, hunger, and homelessness; racism, sexism, and homophobia; violence, oppression, slavery, and colonization; and complex issues of sustainable development and humanitarian aid. Through historical and contemporary analyses, the course addresses critical issues of militarism, inequality, and injustice, emphasizing the development of viable alternatives. This course is highly recommended for first-year students and sophomores interested in pursuing the JUPS major. Since it is an introductory course, it requires permission for seniors. At least two sections are taught per semester, as well as one section in the summer session online. [Enrolled students will have the option of adding a community-based learning (CBL) component through the UNXD-130 fourth-credit option, to be discussed in the class.]

Nonviolence in Theory and Practice (JUPS 202)

After completing the JUPS 123 course, students are required to take JUPS 202 for a foundation in nonviolence. This seminar is taught each fall and spring semester. This course is designed to introduce students to a perspective on nonviolence that integrates theory and practice, drawing upon a wide range of literature and examples. A central aim of the course is to develop a holistic view of nonviolence as a set of practices that range from the personal and local to the national and global. The course seeks to foster an experiential engagement with the tenets of nonviolence, through participation in workshops, activities, and projects in the community and region. The overarching objective is to develop a systematic analysis of nonviolence in order to cultivate effective approaches to addressing contemporary challenges in society through nonviolent means, as well as envisioning and animating a world built on the tenets of nonviolence.

Conflict Transformation (JUPS 271) 

This required course for majors, minors, and certificates offers a thorough grounding of Conflict Transformation as a philosophical orientation, practical approach, and theoretical framework, as well as an analysis of its recent developments. The course strives to “transform” our understanding of three major aspects of conflict: 1) what we think about conflict; 2) how we think about conflict; and 3) how we engage in conflict. Students focus their learning on various contexts as contested spaces for social change and transformation regarding issues of violence, oppression, injustice, development, and difference. Particular emphasis is placed on the work and philosophies of John Burton, John Paul Lederach, Johan Galtung, and Paulo Freire, with a grounding in Conflict Transformation’s foundation of ‘peace by peaceful means’. Drawing on Lederach’s idea that Conflict Transformation is a way of “looking and seeing” conflicts, the course explores the deep culture and structure (Galtung) of conflicts in different settings, and identifies approaches to positive and sustainable change through a social justice lens. [Prerequisites: JUPS 123, successful completion of another JUPS, or permission of instructor.]

Research Methods in Justice and Peace (JUPS 299)

Offered in the fall and summer semesters, this required course explores the theories, practices, and ethics unique to research methodologies in the JUPS field. The course examines both qualitative and quantitative research frameworks including: participatory action research, feminist research methods, ethnographic methodologies, community-based research, ethnomethodologies, phenomenology, and participant observation. Students gain knowledge and experience with various techniques appropriate to inquiries in peace studies and social justice, such as active interviewing, working in fragile contexts and conflict settings, considering context, constructing meaningful surveys, identifying cases appropriate for study, and utilizing research as a tool for social change. The course considers the ethical issues involved with such research, from informed consent and IRB concerns to “ownership” of data and responsible use of research results. Through theoretical and practical engagement, students acquire the research skills necessary for developing a thesis proposal as they move toward completion of the JUPS major. Open to JUPS minors and majors, or by permission of the instructor.

Senior Seminar (JUPS 303)

This required senior seminar is a three-credit capstone course taken in the fall of the senior year that prepares students to write a major paper in close collaboration with a faculty mentor. The thesis is completed over the course of the senior academic year and the grade is awarded retroactively in the spring once the thesis is completed. There are several fundamental and mutually supportive goals for this course: •Work collaboratively as a Justice and Peace cohort for the goal of each student to successfully complete a thesis for completion of the major, through a healthy process. •Hone analytical, writing, presentation, and research skills as justice and peace junior scholars. •Ensure that each thesis is researched and written in ways that further the pursuit of more just and peaceful living, starting with our own. •Create and follow a structured, viable thesis plan agreed upon by the advisor, student, and professor. •Work individually and in small peer groups to create artifacts and revise drafts to achieve clear and direct text. •Dialogue about ethical issues regarding thesis writing, research, and presentation including plagiarism, intellectual property, research ethics, and public responsibility. •Communicate/present the thesis or parts thereof. •Explore how to keep the thesis alive beyond graduation and support one another through the senior year.

Concentrations (3 courses total)

In consultation with a core JUPS faculty member, students will design a concentration consisting of a minimum of three courses, at least two of which must be from core JUPS electives except with faculty permission. Examples of potential concentrations could include: Gender and Justice; Economic Justice; Humanitarian Aid; Conflict Transformation; Nonviolence; Just Peace Leadership; Religion and Peacebuilding; Policy/Advocacy; Reconciliation and Restorative Justice; Ecology and Peace/Justice; Cultural Approaches to Justice and Peace; Social Justice Activism and Organizing; Media and Justice; Human Rights; Social Movements. For example, the following sample concentrations could be rounded out by the following courses noted alongside each one:

  1. Leadership and Activism (potential courses: Sustaining Activism; Social Entrepreneurship; Social Movements)

  2. International Humanitarian Action (potential courses: Protection for Vulnerable Populations; Violence/Gender/Human Rights; Labor/Sexuality/Globalization)

  3. Catholic Social Teaching (potential courses: The Church and the Poor; Catholic Social Teaching and the Environment; Catholic Peacemaking)

  4. Sustainability and Peace (potential courses: Environmental Peacebuilding; Green Politics; Environment and Conflict Transformation)

  5. Conflict Transformation (potential courses: Transitional Justice; Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Political Violence; Transnational Justice; Reconciliation and Forgiveness)

Electives (3 courses total)

Students will take three courses chosen from courses cross-listed with JUPS (see below) or from among core JUPS electives, or courses specifically approved by a core JUPS faculty member. Examples of current and potential JUPS core electives include:

Ethics and Theories of Justice and Peace
Reconciliation: Restorative/Transitional Justice
Violence/Gender/Human Rights
Labor/Sexuality/Globalization
Homelessness and Social Justice
Environmental Peacebuilding
Social Movements
Human Rights
Contemporary Issues in Justice and Peace
Immigration and Social Justice

JUPS has a long history of collaboration with other academic departments at Georgetown, including Philosophy, Theology, Government, SFS, Business, Sociology, Anthropology, Women’s and Gender Studies, History, Nursing and Health Sciences, and others. Following is a brief list of cross-listed courses that JUPS has designated in the past as potential electives:

  • DC: Neighborhoods, Poverty, and Inequality (SOCI 221)

  • Global Inequalities and Social Justice (SOCI 220)

  • CBL: Courage & Moral Leadership (MGMT 278)

  • Law and Society (SOCI 192)

  • The Church and the Poor (THEO 122)

  • Global Health Ethics (STIA 356)

  • Gender and Economic Justice (WGST 220)

  • African American Poetry (ENGL 227)

  • Writing for a Cause (ENGL 294)

  • Ethics: Just Wars (PHIL 113)

  • Social and Political Philosophy (PHIL 389)

Theories or Theologies of Justice and Peace (concurrent required course)

At least one course taken by a JUPS major must emphasize theories or theologies of justice and peace. This requirement can be satisfied through an elective course, or via a General Education course. This is not an additional required course, but a concurrent one; students should consult with a JUPS advisor. Potential courses for this requirement include: Theologies of Social Justice; The Church and the Poor; Catholic Peacemaking; Faith, Social Justice, and Public Life; Just War Theory; Theories of Justice; Struggle and Transcendence; Black Liberation Theology; Catholic Social Teaching; Ethics and Theories of Justice and Peace (core JUPS elective course offered occasionally).

Thesis Requirement

JUPS majors are required to conduct a substantial culminating project, which might come from any of several disciplinary backgrounds. Students have a topic mentor (faculty or other expert in the particular issue, drawn from both internal and external pools of experts and scholars) in addition to the JUPS thesis course professor. Thesis work can be theoretical, empirical, or applied; the thesis should be the equivalent of a 60-page research paper, but need not take the form solely of a research paper (although in most cases we anticipate that it will). For instance, a JUPS thesis could include a photojournalism essay, the development of a peace education curriculum, a policy analysis and report, or a business plan for an NGO. In all such instances, students will still adhere to the basic framework of a scholarly thesis (i.e., methods, theories, data, analysis, conclusions) while working in consultation with the JUPS faculty to produce a capstone document of equivalent depth. The thesis should demonstrate originality of thought, analytical strengths, and the student’s ability to examine texts in a comparative and transdisciplinary perspective, through a justice and peace lens. In addition to the written document, students will be required to present their thesis research to an appropriate audience in consultation with their faculty mentor.

Service Learning Requirement

Students are required to satisfy a Service Learning Requirement through either a Community-Based Learning course or the UNXD-130 4th-Credit Option for Social Action. Students are encouraged to satisfy the Service Learning Requirement early in their program whenever possible, and may choose to take more than one CBL or 4th-credit course during their studies.

Potential Four-Year Course Plan

The specifics of student programs will vary, and part of the JUPS philosophy is to work with students individually to develop unique concentrations and personalize the overall program of study. The following grid merely presents what a potential JUPS major course of study could look like: 

 

Fall

Spring

Freshman

Gen Ed (theories/theologies)

JUPS 123

JUPS 123

(if not taken in the fall)

Sophomore

JUPS 271 or 202

JUPS 271 or 202

Junior

JUPS 299

1 Concentration course

JUPS Elective

2 Concentration courses

Senior

JUPS 303

JUPS Elective

JUPS Elective

(thesis presentation)

 

JUPS Minor/Certificate

The minor (College, NHS, MSB) or certificate (SFS) in Justice and Peace is a 6-course undergraduate endeavor. The requirements include three foundational courses; three electives; and a community-based learning component that can be met through CBL participation or the 4th-credit option (UNXD-130). The SFS Certificate also carries a capstone paper requirement (see below).

Foundational Courses (3 courses total)

Introduction to Justice and Peace (JUPS 123)

This gateway required course presents a wide range of theoretical and practical perspectives on peace and social justice, including: poverty, hunger, and homelessness; racism, sexism, and homophobia; violence, oppression, slavery, and colonization; and complex issues of sustainable development and humanitarian aid. Through historical and contemporary analyses, the course addresses critical issues of militarism, inequality, and injustice, emphasizing the development of viable alternatives. This course is highly recommended for first-year students and sophomores interested in pursuing the JUPS major. Since it is an introductory course, it requires permission for seniors. At least two sections are taught per semester, as well as one section in the summer session. [Enrolled students will have the option of adding a community-based learning (CBL) component through the UNXD-130 fourth-credit option, to be discussed in the class.]

Nonviolence in Theory and Practice (JUPS 202)

After completing the JUPS 123 course, students are required to take JUPS 202 for a foundation in nonviolence. This seminar is taught each fall and spring semester. This community-based learning (CBL) course is designed to introduce students to a perspective on nonviolence that integrates theory and practice, drawing upon a wide range of literature and examples. A central aim of the course is to develop a holistic view of nonviolence as a set of practices that range from the personal and local to the national and global. The course seeks to foster an experiential engagement with the tenets of nonviolence, through participation in workshops, activities, and projects in the community and region. The overarching objective is to develop a systematic analysis of nonviolence in order to cultivate effective approaches to addressing contemporary challenges in society through nonviolent means, as well as envisioning and animating a world built on the tenets of nonviolence.

Conflict Transformation (JUPS 271) 

This required course for majors, minors, and certificates offers a thorough grounding of Conflict Transformation as a philosophical orientation, practical approach, and theoretical framework, as well as an analysis of its recent developments. The course strives to “transform” our understanding of three major aspects of conflict: 1) what we think about conflict; 2) how we think about conflict; and 3) how we engage in conflict. Students focus their learning on various contexts as contested spaces for social change and transformation regarding issues of violence, oppression, injustice, development, and difference. Particular emphasis is placed on the work and philosophies of John Burton, John Paul Lederach, Johan Galtung, and Paulo Freire, with a grounding in Conflict Transformation’s foundation of ‘peace by peaceful means’. Drawing on Lederach’s idea that Conflict Transformation is a way of “looking and seeing” conflicts, the course explores the deep culture and structure (Galtung) of conflicts in different settings, and identifies approaches to positive and sustainable change through a social justice lens. [Prerequisites: JUPS 123, successful completion of another JUPS, or permission of instructor.]

Electives (3 courses total)

Students will take three courses chosen from courses cross-listed with JUPS (see below) or from among core JUPS electives, or courses specifically approved by a core JUPS faculty member. Examples of current and potential JUPS core electives include:

Ethics and Theories of Justice and Peace
Reconciliation: Restorative/Transitional Justice
Violence/Gender/Human Rights
Labor/Sexuality/Globalization
Homelessness and Social Justice
Environmental Peacebuilding
Social Movements
Human Rights
Contemporary Issues in Justice and Peace
Immigration and Social Justice

JUPS has a long history of collaboration with other academic departments at Georgetown, including Philosophy, Theology, Government, SFS, Business, Sociology, Anthropology, Women’s and Gender Studies, History, Nursing and Health Sciences, and others. Following is a brief list of cross-listed courses that JUPS has designated in the past as potential electives:

  • DC: Neighborhoods, Poverty, and Inequality (SOCI 221)

  • Global Inequalities and Social Justice (SOCI 220)

  • Law and Society (SOCI 192)

  • The Church and the Poor (THEO 122)

  • Global Health Ethics (STIA 356)

  • Gender and Economic Justice (WGST 220)

  • African American Poetry (ENGL 227)

  • Writing for a Cause (ENGL 294)

  • Ethics: Just Wars (PHILO 113)

  • Social and Political Philosophy (PHILO 389)

Service Learning Requirement

Students are required to satisfy a Service Learning Requirement through either a Community-Based Learning course or the UNXD-130 4th-Credit Option for Social Action. Students are encouraged to satisfy the Service Learning Requirement early in their program whenever possible, and may choose to take more than one CBL or 4th-credit course during their studies.

School of Foreign Service Certificate Capstone Requirement

SFS students pursuing a JUPS Certificate will complete a capstone requirement that may be satisfied in one of two ways: (1) a 20-25 page paper written in the context of any JUPS course (with instructor consent and approval) taken during the senior year, or (2) enrollment in JUPS 303 (Senior Seminar) and completed a 40-page senior thesis in that course. For option (1) the paper may be research-driven, or could take another form if done with the approval of a JUPS faculty member and the student's SFS Dean; students will work with the professor in the course where the capstone paper is being done to establish specific guidelines appropriate for a paper in that course.  For option (2) students will participate in the Senior Seminar course in the fall semester and complete their capstone thesis project by the end of the spring term, in consultation with the course instructor and a thesis mentor to be selected during the course. [Note that SFS certificate students can double-count up to two SFS courses as electives for the JUPS Certificate (with approval of a JUPS core faculty member, or the program director).]