Major, Minor, and Certificate Requirements

Course Descriptions

Please see the "Course Offerings" page for detailed descriptions of every class. Click here to be redirected to the current, full JUPS course list on that page. 

Click below to expand information on the relevant academic programming. 

JUPS Major 

Students are required to complete a total of 11 courses in the major, including the completion of a Service Learning Requirement through either a Community-Based Learning course or the application of the 4th-Credit Option for Social Action (UNXD-130). In addition, students are encouraged to meet with a JUPS advisor to consider General Education courses that may satisfy requirements for the major. At least one course must be taken on theories or theologies of justice and peace; this requirement could be satisfied by a General Education course or a cross-listed JUPS elective, which would count toward the total of 11 major courses (with approval of a JUPS advisor). JUPS majors may conclude their program with an optional thesis project as part of the Senior Seminar course. Please see the "Thesis Option" subpage for more details on this facet of the program. The requirements for the JUPS major are as follows:

Foundational Courses (5 courses total)

  • Introduction to Justice and Peace (JUPS 123)
  • Nonviolence in Theory and Practice (JUPS 202)
  • Conflict Transformation (JUPS 271) 
  • Research Methods in Justice and Peace (JUPS 299)
  • Senior Seminar (JUPS 303)*

*if thesis option is chosen

Concentrations (3 courses total)

In consultation with a core JUPS faculty member, students will design a concentration consisting of a minimum of three courses, at least two of which must be from core JUPS electives except with faculty permission. Students may create their own concentrations.

Examples of potential concentrations include: Gender and Justice; Economic Justice; Humanitarian Aid; Conflict Transformation; Nonviolence; Education and Justice; Religion and Peacebuilding; Policy/Advocacy; Reconciliation and Restorative Justice; Ecology and Peace/Justice; Youth and Social Justice; Social Justice Activism and Organizing; Media and Justice; Human Rights; Social Movements.

Sample concentrations could be filled using the following courses (examples; not requirements), as noted below:

  • Leadership and Activism with the potential courses: Sustaining Activism; Social Entrepreneurship; Social Movement)
  • International Humanitarian Action with the potential courses: Humanatarianism, Protection for Vulnerable Populations; Violence/Gender/Human Rights; Labor/Sexuality/Globalization)
  • Catholic Social Teaching with the potential courses: The Church and the Poor; Catholic Social Teaching and the Environment; Catholic Peacemaking
  • Sustainability and Peace with the potential courses: Environmental Peacebuilding; Green Politics; Environment and Conflict Transformation
  • Conflict Transformation with the potential courses: Transitional Justice; Critical Perspectives on Terrorism and Political Violence; Politics of Memory; Reconciliation and Forgiveness

Electives (3 courses total)

Students will take three courses chosen from courses cross-listed with JUPS (see below) or from among core JUPS electives, or courses specifically approved by a core JUPS faculty member. Examples of current and potential JUPS core electives include:

  • Ethics and Theories of Justice and Peace
  • Violence/Gender/Human Rights
  • Peacebuilding/Sustainable Development
  • Transitional Justice/Collective Memory
  • Humanatarianism, Global Justice
  • Labor/Sexuality/Globalization
  • Homelessness and Social Justice
  • Environmental Peacebuilding
  • Social Movements
  • Human Rights
  • Contemporary Issues in Justice and Peace
  • Immigration and Social Justice

JUPS has a long history of collaboration with other academic departments at Georgetown, including Philosophy, Theology, Government, SFS, Business, Sociology, Anthropology, Women’s and Gender Studies, History, Nursing and Health Sciences, and others. Following is a brief list of cross-listed courses that JUPS has designated in the past as potential electives:

  • DC: Neighborhoods, Poverty, and Inequality (SOCI 221)
  • Global Inequalities and Social Justice (SOCI 220)
  • CBL: Courage & Moral Leadership (MGMT 278)
  • Law and Society (SOCI 192)
  • The Church and the Poor (THEO 122)
  • Global Health Ethics (STIA 356)
  • Gender and Economic Justice (WGST 220)
  • African American Poetry (ENGL 227)
  • Writing for a Cause (ENGL 294)
  • Ethics: Just Wars (PHIL 113)
  • Social and Political Philosophy (PHIL 389)

Theories or Theologies of Justice and Peace (concurrent required course)

At least one course taken by a JUPS major must emphasize theories or theologies of justice and peace. This requirement can be satisfied through an elective course, or via a General Education course. This is not an additional required course, but a concurrent one; students should consult with a JUPS advisor. Potential courses for this requirement include: Theologies of Social Justice; The Church and the Poor; Catholic Peacemaking; Faith, Social Justice, and Public Life; Just War Theory; Theories of Justice; Struggle and Transcendence; Black Liberation Theology; Catholic Social Teaching; Ethics and Theories of Justice and Peace (core JUPS elective course offered occasionally).

Thesis Option

The Justice and Peace Studies program provides students the option to work closely with a Georgetown University faculty member on an independent research project that culminates in a thesis. Students interested in the thesis should arrange to discuss this with their JUPS faculty adviser and complete this required application form. The thesis begins with the proposal and application process in the fall of a student's senior year (deadline for thesis application Oct 6th, 2017). Following approvals of 1) successful application process and 2) approval/signature on contract by thesis mentor, students will register for 1-3 credits in JUPS302 with a faculty mentor (thesis tutorial) in the spring and begin intense work and research on their selected topic and meetings with the faculty mentor. Work done on the thesis during the spring term is graded by the faculty mentor for credit, which represents the completion of the thesis. The thesis should not exceed 60 pages in length. In April of the Senior year, students that have completed the thesis will make presentations of their projects at the GU undergraduate research colloquium (to which all faculty and students are invited) or another appropriate forum to be determined.

Click HERE to submit a thesis proposal.

Service Learning Requirement

Students are required to satisfy a Service Learning Requirement through either a Community-Based Learning course or the UNXD-130 4th-Credit Option for Social Action. Students are encouraged to satisfy the Service Learning Requirement early in their program whenever possible, and may choose to take more than one CBL or 4th-credit course during their studies.

Potential Four-Year Course Plan

The specifics of student programs will vary, and part of the JUPS philosophy is to work with students individually to develop unique concentrations and personalize the overall program of study. The following grid  presents an example of how a potential JUPS major course of study could look: 

 

 

Fall

Spring

First Year

Gen Ed (theories/theologies)

JUPS 123

JUPS 123

(if not taken in the fall)

Sophomore

JUPS 271 or 202

JUPS 271 or 202

Junior

JUPS 299

1 Concentration course

JUPS Elective

2 Concentration courses

Senior

JUPS 303

JUPS Elective

JUPS Elective

 

 

 

JUPS Minor and Certificate Programs

The minor (COL, NHS, MSB) or certificate (SFS) in Justice and Peace is a 6-course undergraduate endeavor. The requirements include three foundational courses; three electives; and a community-based learning component that can be met through CBL participation or the 4th-credit option (UNXD-130). The SFS Certificate also has an optional capstone paper (see below).

Foundational Courses (3 courses total)

Introduction to Justice and Peace (JUPS 123)

Nonviolence in Theory and Practice (JUPS 202)

Conflict Transformation (JUPS 271) 

Electives (3 courses total)

Students will take three courses chosen from courses cross-listed with JUPS (see below) or from among core JUPS electives, or courses specifically approved by a core JUPS faculty member. Examples of current and potential JUPS core electives include:

  • Ethics and Theories of Justice and Peace
  • Reconciliation: Restorative/Transitional Justice
  • Violence/Gender/Human Rights
  • Labor/Sexuality/Globalization
  • Homelessness and Social Justice
  • Environmental Peacebuilding
  • Social Movements
  • Human Rights
  • Contemporary Issues in Justice and Peace
  • Immigration and Social Justice

JUPS has a long history of collaboration with other academic departments at Georgetown, including Philosophy, Theology, Government, SFS, Business, Sociology, Anthropology, Women’s and Gender Studies, History, Nursing and Health Sciences, and others. Following is a brief list of cross-listed courses that JUPS has designated in the past as potential electives:

  • DC: Neighborhoods, Poverty, and Inequality (SOCI 221)
  • Global Inequalities and Social Justice (SOCI 220)
  • CBL: Courage & Moral Leadership (MGMT 278)
  • Law and Society (SOCI 192)
  • The Church and the Poor (THEO 122)
  • Global Health Ethics (STIA 356)
  • Gender and Economic Justice (WGST 220)
  • African American Poetry (ENGL 227)
  • Writing for a Cause (ENGL 294)
  • Ethics: Just Wars (PHIL 113)
  • Social and Political Philosophy (PHIL 389)

Service Learning Requirement

Students are required to satisfy a Service Learning Requirement through either a Community-Based Learning course or the UNXD-130 4th-Credit Option for Social Action. Students are encouraged to satisfy the Service Learning Requirement early in their program whenever possible, and may choose to take more than one CBL or 4th-credit course during their studies.

School of Foreign Service Certificate Capstone Requirement

SFS students pursuing a JUPS Certificate will complete a capstone that may be satisfied by finishing a 25-30 page paper written in the context of any JUPS course (with instructor consent and approval) taken during the senior year. The paper may be research-driven, or could take another form if done with the approval of a JUPS faculty member and the student's SFS Dean; students will work with the professor in the course where the capstone paper is being done to establish specific guidelines appropriate for a paper in that course.  [Note that SFS certificate students can double-count up to two SFS courses as electives for the JUPS Certificate (with approval of a JUPS Program directors).] The SFS certificate capstone project is a requirement for the JUPS certificate.